Joe’s Birthday Workshop Discovering Dumbo & Gleasons

©JoAnne Kalish

Joe had a fun workshop in Dumbo on March 25th his birthday.  We had quite a turn out.  Everybody enjoys going to Gleason’s as it’s a one of a kind, kind of  place.  We had 4 students who were from other countries as well.   Yes there’s Ann Raine in the front holding the reflector & Larry Malang on the right.  Peter Poremba the President of Dynalite was also there to set up several lighting stations and answered lots of technical questions on his products. It was a great group!

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Mermaid Parade 2011 Photo Workshop

Well a fun day was had by all.  Great to be outside all day long on a glorious day, doing what I love to do most.


Tip for the day day is on aperture. What aperture should you use for portraiture?  For a head shot of a single person I generally like to open up to a wide f/stop to blur out my background. That’s my preference because I like the look of it and find it particularly attractive and it makes for a stronger photograph. When used on women (who we have to be more careful with) it softens the face and complexion leaving the most important feature sharp which is the eyes. However, there are exceptions especially when you are shooting in crowds and where there are lots of people and different things happening such as at the Mermaid Parade, where I just did a workshop. In a situation like this, where you want to be flexible and spontaneous, you might want to choose to use a medium depth-of-field for a little more depth of field. When a situation arises and you have a little more time to to make a change and want to throw more of your background out-of-focus and again to get a stronger photo, open up your aperture, that is, providing you have the light. Again, in the studio I like to choose a shallow depth of field especially for women.  Studio lights can show imperfections and reveal too much. If the person is young and their complexion is good,  you have choices, but the older we get the more lines and imperfections we get on our faces and the more we notice them.  So, the photographer should be aware of this. When photographing more than one person you need a medium aperture to make sure your subjects are in focus. For children, more times then not because they can’t hold still sometimes a choice of  a medium to small aperture is better.
 

Montauk Point Long Island Late September

© JoAnne Kalish 

Recently spent a week in Montauk Long Island staying at  friend’s Tommy & Theresa beautiful home. Thank you so much Tommy, Theresa, & daughter Victoria –  it was great!  Haven’t been to Montauk in a long, long, time and have always loved the place.  Brought back wonderful memories of deep sea shark & giant tuna fishing, old friends, fun times, good memories & of course the unforgettable Captain Frank Mundus and our Discovery Channel Special.

Made some great photos, swam in the cold ocean, which by the way, was the best!  Had lots of wonderful fresh seafood and chilled out while there.  I photographed early morning sunrises & sunsets at Montauk Point Lighthouse, Fishermen, and waves crashing along the shoreline. Only wish we had more time to stay.

Tips for those wanting to go – bring a tripod ( a must), shoot long exposures to capture the flow & motion of water, remember exposures for back light, silhouettes, when to use lots of depth-of- field & when to open up for shallow depth-of-field. Also remember your  fill flash for added dimension, & keep your photos clean and as simple as possible.

*Photo is available for purchase 

Lions, Tigers, and Monkeys…Oh my…


© MMX JoAnne Kalish
Bronx Zoo Workshop

The last time I was at the Bronx Zoo our son Dylan was maybe 6 years old and I remember loving it. Here it is many years later and we had a workshop at the zoo. It was thoroughly enjoyable, once again we had a great group. Unfortunately, we were a little surprised as there were some exhibits behind glass which was something we were not told about by Bronx Zoo PR people. In spite of this, I think we all got some great shots. The attached Tigers & Ebony Lampur Monkey was taken with a Sigma 300mm 2.8 and a 2x extender. Long fast lenses were the answer as always at the zoo.